ASA slams TBWA Simons ’drugs’ ads

TBWA Simons Palmer has been warned by industry watchdogs about allusions to drugs in advertising for two separate clients - the News of the World and Sony Playstation - while Ikea has been told to be more sensitive about the pain of infertility.

TBWA Simons Palmer has been warned by industry watchdogs about

allusions to drugs in advertising for two separate clients - the News of

the World and Sony Playstation - while Ikea has been told to be more

sensitive about the pain of infertility.



The Advertising Standards Authority has censured the News of the World

for triv-ialising drug abuse in a magazine ad that was part of its ’if

it goes on, it goes in’ campaign. This showed a footballer appearing to

snort from a white line on a pitch as if it were cocaine.



Meanwhile, Sony has withdrawn a TBWA Simons poster for a Playstation

console game after 28 complaints to the ASA about its allusions to

drugs.



The ad featured a snowboarder with the words: ’Powder. I need powder. My

body aches, yells, screams for powder. When I’m on it I get a rush, a

buzz, the blood coursing through my veins. I get really high.’



At the same time, Ikea, the furnishing retailer, has been told by the

ASA to think carefully before tackling sensitive subjects such as

infertility or the treatment of children.



However, it dismissed complaints about two posters produced by St

Luke’s. One claimed that ’new statistics suggest that in homes with

pelmets, parents are twice as likely to smack their children’. Another

suggested that ’a new survey has found that people conceive more easily

when their homes contain at least one red cushion’.



Objectors said the posters implied that Ikea shoppers were better

parents and were offensive to childless couples.



Guinness has also been cleared of unfairly maligning the nuclear power

and fishing industries with an Ogilvy & Mather poster showing a

two-headed fish on a plate with the headline: ’’Nuclear power is

completely safe with no environmental problems.’ Prof D. Heardman.’



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