BACKBITE

Adspeak: The reporters at Campaign got to thinking about this last week when the press release about the formation of a new agency - let’s just call it Bollocks & Partners - informed us it was going to ’break ad agencies’ assembly-line mentality’, while offering its clients - including Proctor (sic) & Gamble - everything from product and corporate identity (’Oh yes, we can throw in a bit of management consultancy and window cleaning too if you’d like it, sir’) to new media and advertising. The point of this preamble is not to illustrate how vulnerable agencies are to the naff press release, but to show how few propositions agencies can claim as ’new’.

Adspeak: The reporters at Campaign got to thinking about this last

week when the press release about the formation of a new agency - let’s

just call it Bollocks & Partners - informed us it was going to ’break ad

agencies’ assembly-line mentality’, while offering its clients -

including Proctor (sic) & Gamble - everything from product and corporate

identity (’Oh yes, we can throw in a bit of management consultancy and

window cleaning too if you’d like it, sir’) to new media and

advertising. The point of this preamble is not to illustrate how

vulnerable agencies are to the naff press release, but to show how few

propositions agencies can claim as ’new’.



I’m pretty certain the engine of industry change doesn’t reside any

longer with the big multinationals. Yes, they are talking about change,

and sending their brainiest people to study for MBAs to broaden their

business nous. But my overwhelming impression is the big fish are

talking and worrying about change while the minnows (such as Mother,

which has just won Coca-Cola’s Lilt brand and some of the newer

through-the-line and specialist marketing communications shops) are

actually doing it.



I’m tempting fate because the win has yet to be confirmed, but how else

can we explain Redwood Publishing’s win of the Heinz at Home contract

publishing account from respected direct marketing giant, WWAV Rapp

Collins? A few years ago, the thought of a jumped-up contract publisher

offering its new business spiel to a blue-chip fmcg advertiser such as

Heinz would have been heresy. Now we are not in the least surprised,

given Redwood’s reputation for producing customer magazines that work

and look as good as their consumer counterparts, and Heinz at Home’s air

of a magazine that has never quite left behind the murky world of

brochures. Creative thinking, after all, is what clients are after - not

layers of client service.



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