BACKBITE

I’m with David Abbott when it comes to computers. To show how little he understood the PowerBook concept, Abbott originally requisitioned two - one for the office and one for home. Like Abbott, however, one day I know I’ll be computer literate - the day I win the lottery, buy Mustique and give up writing the world’s worst-positioned column for a living.

I’m with David Abbott when it comes to computers. To show how

little he understood the PowerBook concept, Abbott originally

requisitioned two - one for the office and one for home. Like Abbott,

however, one day I know I’ll be computer literate - the day I win the

lottery, buy Mustique and give up writing the world’s worst-positioned

column for a living.



As you all know, the first duty of this column is to call a turkey a

turkey. Or could it be my role, just once, to talk about what I consider

a gem - TBWA/Chiat Day’s new ’think different’ campaign for Apple

Computer?



Having invented the first commercially successful PC, which inspired IBM

to create its own rival, Apple’s fortunes began a long and largely

self-inflicted decline in the 80s; its insistence on high profit margins

kept prices high and its market share dwindled. Now, with its

credibility returning, Apple (expensive as its products still are) can

promote itself as the computer company for people who have ideas.



The TV work features footage of rebels such as Einstein, Gandhi and

Branson, the idea being to associate Apple with misfits who have changed

the world or, as the ad puts it, ’it’s the people who are crazy enough

to think they can change the world, who actually do’.



This is a nice way of avoiding the usual fuzzy logic of computer ads -

many of which, I’m convinced, are written by people who don’t get out

enough, and are aimed at polyester-clad nerds whose enthusiasm for

playing with technology overshadows other aspects of life, such as

socialising or washing.



I’m reminded of a story about Apple which makes you wonder what Chiat

Day did to the client to convince it to buy this idea. To correct a

manufacturing fault, Apple recommended that buyers of the Apple III

computer lift the machine a couple of feet from a hard surface and drop

it. Now why isn’t creating great advertising that simple?



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