Boddingtons ad in drugs controversy

Bartle Bogle Hegarty is courting more controversy over its Boddingtons beer ads with a new execution in which a cud-chewing cow remarks: ’Good grass man.’

Bartle Bogle Hegarty is courting more controversy over its

Boddingtons beer ads with a new execution in which a cud-chewing cow

remarks: ’Good grass man.’



The ad, one of a series appearing on bus backs in London and Manchester,

is part of the latest pounds 1.1 million campaign featuring a bizarre

talking cow which, despite sporting udders, is called Graham.



The cartoon character caused a stir when it made its debut on TV five

months ago.



However, the Independent Television Commission threw out 76 complaints

that the commercial was too sexually explicit, and promoted bestiality

and homosexuality.



The Advertising Standards Authority has warned against the use of

drug-related words and imagery in ads. But this week ASA executives were

making it clear that it would be up to the public to judge it.



Caroline Crawford, the ASA’s public affairs director, said: ’We take a

dim view of drug references but we would want to see how people

interpret the ad. If it’s seen clearly as tongue-in-cheek there would be

no problem.’



BBH acknowledges the double entendre but insists that no media owners

have refused to accept the ad.



Graham was drafted in as the spokesperson for the brand, famous for its

’cream of Manchester’ ads.



The campaign is designed to make Boddingtons top of mind with drinkers

during the key Christmas period.



The ads were written by Adam Chiappe and art directed by Mathew

Saunby.



Media is by Motive through TDI.



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