Brands admit to flouting ad industry code on influencer marketing

Today's top stories including, brands admit to flouting ad industry code on influencer marketing and Asos to close local China operation after business fails to gain traction.

Brands admit to flouting ad industry code on influencer marketing

Brands admit to flouting ad industry code on influencer marketing

Most read: Brands admit to flouting ad industry code on influencer marketing

Six in 10 marketing and PR professionals admit to flouting the UK's official code around influencer marketing, a study has found.

The survey of 500 professionals found that 37 per cent admitted to fully adhering to the CAP code of conduct, while one in eight people surveyed said they did not know "at all" what the code is.

Out of those that were familiar with the recommendations, over a third actively choose not to adhere to it due to a lack of understanding or a reluctance to be transparent about paid-for content.

The Advertising Standards Authority said that not disclosing paid commercial content is a banned practice under consumer protection law.


 Barclays lauds top football fans in last major campaign as Premier League title sponsor

Advertising: Barclays lauds top football fans in last major campaign as Premier League title sponsor

Barclays is launching its last big ad campaign as the title sponsor of the Premier League, as its 15-year deal comes to an end in June.

The campaign, called 'I am One', will kick off a search for a worthy fan to present the trophy in May to the winning team of England’s top football competition.

The TV ad, created by Havas Sports & Entertainment Cake, focuses on three people who have benefited from Barclays’ sponsorship of the Premier League, such as through ticket giveaways and investment in local football initiatives.

With the help of a voiceover from former England captain Alan Shearer, the ad explains that "you could be the one" to win a chance to present the trophy, as well as win other prizes, through its Spirit of the Game competition.

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Asos to close local China operation after business fails to gain traction

Retail: Asos to close local China operation after business fails to gain traction

Asos is calling time on its local China operation after an unsuccessful launch in a market that many British retailers are rushing to cash in on.

The retailer has revealed closing the China operation will cost the business £10m.

Asos chief executive Nick Beighton said the retailer will continue to do business in China through its Asos.com website.

He added: "We are simply serving our growing customer base there in a more efficient, less costly manner."

Chinese consumers will now be able to order the full 80,000-strong product range from Asos.com, but will no longer benefit from having a local Chinese business that offered a range of 6,000 products.

Also in the news


Huawei signs up Scarlett Johansson and camera brand Leica to launch P9 smartphone

Marketing: Huawei signs up Scarlett Johansson and camera brand Leica to launch P9 smartphone

Huawei unveiled its latest flagship smartphone, the P9, this week at a theatrical, two-and-a-half-hour launch event in London.

For Huawei, the P9 launch was a statement of intent. The event was conspicuously co-branded with specialist camera brand Leica, whose technology appears on the P9 and P9 Plus phones.

The Chinese mobile brand has also signed up Scarlett Johansson and Batman v Superman star Henry Cavill to feature in an ad campaign for the phone.

In addition Leica’s CEO, Oliver Kaltner, was given some 20 minutes on stage to pitch not so much the new phone as his own company’s vision for mobile photography.

Huawei’s consumer business group CEO, Richard Yu, described Leica as a "famous, iconic brand", noting that some of Huawei’s own employees were Leica camera "nerds".

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Study reveals low trust in media agencies agencies

Media: Study reveals low trust in media agencies
agencies 

Almost a third of advertisers rate trust levels with media agencies as low or very low in the wake of the rebate scandal that broke in the US last year.

A survey from ID Comms found that 31 per cent of clients described trust between media agencies and advertisers as low or very low, while only 10 per cent rated it as high or very high.

Agencies were more optimistic, with 19 per cent of those surveyed rating trust between themselves and clients as high or very high. Twenty per cent said it was low or very low.

"The lack of transparency into holding company operations and whether agencies are acting as true agents is at the heart of why I see trust in decline," one marketer said.

"In addition, programmatic buying and the inherent arbitrage and inability to ‘follow the money’ create distrust."

The results were more muddled when projecting the future: 39 per cent of agencies bet relations would get worse, while 38 per cent predicted they would get better.

Only 31 per cent of clients thought trust would decline, compared with 38 per cent who expected it to improve.

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