Britishness makes comeback

That Rover should be considering incorporating Britishness into its new corporate identity is, to say the least, ironic. During the last years of national ownership, the company stripped out the word ’British’ from its name - the right move, given the terrible reputation that British Leyland had developed in the strike-hit 70s.

That Rover should be considering incorporating Britishness into its

new corporate identity is, to say the least, ironic. During the last

years of national ownership, the company stripped out the word ’British’

from its name - the right move, given the terrible reputation that

British Leyland had developed in the strike-hit 70s.



Only now, when the company is German-owned, does the Union Jack look

likely to make a comeback. Don’t get us wrong - we’re not complaining

about Rover’s current ownership, as we believe the fewer barriers to

international trade the better. But we’re saddened that it’s taken so

long for Britishness to again become a brand asset, while so many firms

that could have capitalised on it have been swept away.



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