Butterkist returns to TV with ’the fun’s never done’ theme

WCRS’s first work for Trebor Bassett’s Butterkist popcorn brand breaks on national television on 18 April in a campaign worth pounds 3.6 million.

WCRS’s first work for Trebor Bassett’s Butterkist popcorn brand

breaks on national television on 18 April in a campaign worth pounds 3.6

million.



The new work - marking Butterkist’s return to television after a

five-year break - aims to reposition Butterkist as a staple snack, as

well as boosting awareness of the brand.



It comprises five commercials which all feature a pair of practical

jokers constantly munching on big bags of Butterkist and causing havoc

wherever they go.



Their slapstick stunts, such as replacing golf balls with eggs and

shocking hairdressers by wearing a wig to the barber’s, reflect Danish

director Johan Gulbranson’s passion for off-the-wall humour.



The endline, ’the fun’s never done’, reinforces the sentiment that

Butterkist is at the heart of the fun, as the clowning pair merrily

force handfuls of the popcorn down each other’s throats.



The commercials were written and art directed by Alan MacCuish and

Darren Bailes of WCRS with production by Outsider.



’With this campaign, Butterkist should start to become an alternative to

crisps and peanuts, in a market that will heighten its potential

considerably,’ Stephen Woodford, managing director of WCRS, said.



The top and tail ads will run for a minimum of 12 weeks on all national

and satellite television, targeting 16- to 24-year-old adults with a

bias towards mothers and children. Media planning and buying is through

Motive.



WCRS picked up the popcorn account last year following the brand’s

acquisition by Trebor Bassett in 1996



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