Campaign Craft: Portfolio

Rupert Sanders may be just 25 but is already being groomed for stardom by none other than Tony Kaye. The great man offered him a place at Tony Kaye Films nearly a year ago and is currently creative director on his first major US commercial for Gatorade.

Rupert Sanders may be just 25 but is already being groomed for

stardom by none other than Tony Kaye. The great man offered him a place

at Tony Kaye Films nearly a year ago and is currently creative director

on his first major US commercial for Gatorade.



Nevertheless, Sanders tells you: ’Tony is my guru but I’m not the next

Tony Kaye.’ A glance at his reel proves that despite his admiration for

his boss, Sanders is no copycat. There are certain similarities, most

notably the shared interest in children, an eye for unusual casting and

creating effects in camera, the last two of which were learned from

Kaye.



But he insists: ’My angle is totally different.’



The two first met in 1995 in Los Angeles while Sanders was doing a road

trip across the US after graduating from St Martin’s School of Art with

a first-class degree in graphics. The pair hit it off



socially but Sanders was only invited to the company after independently

writing and directing the Sony commercial which is still the centrepiece

of his reel. It was sold, as seen, to Sony’s agency, BMP DDB.



Since then, he has shown an ability to make even small projects

memorable.



Films for Capital Radio’s Help a London Child and Woolworth’s both

feature children and show an unmawkish eye for humour and performance.

He was also responsible for the sinister, type-based ad for the style

magazine, Blah Blah Blah.



Sanders admits that it has been a rapid rise, especially for someone

with no formal film-making training. He says he has learned on the job

by staying calm on shoots and surrounding himself with a trusted,

technically-able team - most



notably the director of photography, Jesse Hall, and the producer, Amy

Appleton.



And his confidence is growing all the time.



A recent commercial for the British milliner, Philip Treacy, proves the

boy can do stylish fashion work with the best of them. ’I’d like to work

with anything from kids to rock stars, as long as I’m not typecast,’ he

says. If half the projects currently lined up come off, he should have

his wish.



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