CAMPAIGN DIARY: Channel 5 highlights ad industry’s creative talent in competition

It’s good to see that so many of you have a conscience, judging by Channel 5’s Visions 5 series of short films on social culture, which goes on-air at the end of the month. Twenty-five of the 400 entries to the competition, organised by the Media Trust, Channel 5 and the British Television Advertising Awards, are now in production.

It’s good to see that so many of you have a conscience, judging by

Channel 5’s Visions 5 series of short films on social culture, which

goes on-air at the end of the month. Twenty-five of the 400 entries to

the competition, organised by the Media Trust, Channel 5 and the British

Television Advertising Awards, are now in production.



Even a familiar face has got involved. ’Road cone factory’, which draws

parallels between the redundancy of road cones and the over-40s, was

directed by, and stars, Philip Thomas, a creative director of Davidson

Pearce in the mid-80s. It seems that after the agency was bought by

Omnicom, Thomas joined James Garrett & Co as a director.



We were impressed by how many participants came from companies such as

M&C Saatchi, Godman, Pink and Miles Calcraft.



The Leith Agency made ’mmm’, an unsettling film about the grotesque

cycle that raw sewage goes through. It shows a man eating fish and

chips, before going to the toilet and his excrement being consumed by a

fish that eventually ends up on his plate.



’Perfect baby’, from Ogilvy & Mather’s Dave Williams, was a bit scary,

showing futuristic technology that will allow parents to choose their

kids at the touch of a button.



One of the most original films was by the Ulster University student,

Andrew Dobbin. ’Parallel streets’ is a stark portrayal of

sectarianism.



Of course, we should have known you weren’t being that charitable in

donating your efforts. The winning film will be awarded a prize at the

BTAA Craft Awards in November.



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