Campaign Direct Awards focus on creative ideas

Campaign this week launches a set of annual awards aimed at recognising the excellence of creative ideas in direct marketing.

Campaign this week launches a set of annual awards aimed at

recognising the excellence of creative ideas in direct marketing.



The Campaign Direct Awards has a clear remit, expressed by its slogan,

’where creative ideas count’. The concept is to recognise and promote

the role creative ideas play in effective direct communications.



The initiative is the result of an approach made to Campaign by the

industry’s leading agencies, anxious that the improvements in creative

standards made in recent years be recognised among the wider media and

marketing communities.



The awards have been structured in consultation with these and other

practitioners. The aim was to make the entry procedure simple and

concise.



There are only 11 silver categories and each entry will be accompanied

by a 200-word contextual explanation signed off by the client.



The first jury will be chaired by the Evans Hunt Scott co-founder, Terry

Hunt, who commented: ’It is an established fact that there are too many

awards schemes. But in direct marketing there has always been a gap. We

need a scheme that has the confidence to focus on exceptional creativity

and the authority to make that recognition valued. The principle of the

Campaign Direct Awards is that less means more. They will reward ideas

that are relevant but also surprising. They will be prized. They’ll be

hot.’



Stefano Hatfield, Campaign’s editor, said: ’There appears to be a

genuine desire for a scheme to complement the DMA/Royal Mail awards. We

hope the Campaign Direct Awards will fly the flag for creativity in the

direct sector.’



Full story, p8.



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