CAMPAIGN DIRECT: MY BEST SHOT

When you work on Nike you have one distinct advantage over the poor bugger who’s trying to flog a pot of Muller Rice. Sport is a subject the target audience feels passionate about.

When you work on Nike you have one distinct advantage over the poor

bugger who’s trying to flog a pot of Muller Rice. Sport is a subject the

target audience feels passionate about.



I was working with Giles Montgomery (now at Wieden and Kennedy,

Amsterdam). The idea was ‘to put Nike, through its association with Eric

Cantona, at the centre of football culture’.



The ad managed to capture something of Cantona’s attitude and audacity,

by mentioning a Frenchman in the same sentence as the most sacred moment

in the history of English football.



Not since John McEnroe has there been such an excellent sportsman whose

on-field presence and attitude expresses the sentiment ‘I’m playing the

game on my own terms - not anyone else’s’ - the embodiment of the spirit

of the individual ‘just do it’.



All credit to Nike for sponsoring him.



We thought about how we could use the ad in other media. We cut a couple

of inches off each end of the mech and got lucky at the Campaign Press

Awards.



Then Peter Bracegirdle, an account man on Nike, had the idea of turning

the poster into a flag and was greeted by rapturous indifference.



He then explained how the 40ft x 20ft flag would then be smuggled into

Old Trafford and unfurled by the crowd. An instant 90-minute TV

commercial. Several weeks and one bribed turnstile operator later the

flag appeared on News at Ten. We’ve never been able to get the flag back

from the United fans.



As an agency we marketed the poster to prospective clients in the form

of a postcard and have continued to do this with work we’re particularly

proud of.



Andy McKay is joint creative director at Simons Palmer Clemmow Johnson