CAMPAIGN INTERNATIONAL: WHAT’S HOT IN GERMANY

If I remember correctly, the word ’hot’ in English not only relates to temperature but is also used to describe the affects of pepper and paprika. But it doesn’t matter whether you examine German advertising with a thermometer or tongue - the results will be the same. What is served up here is more in the line of cold cuts, or diet food for people with kidney problems.

If I remember correctly, the word ’hot’ in English not only relates

to temperature but is also used to describe the affects of pepper and

paprika. But it doesn’t matter whether you examine German advertising

with a thermometer or tongue - the results will be the same. What is

served up here is more in the line of cold cuts, or diet food for people

with kidney problems.



The exemptions come from other countries, such as the campaign made in

Amsterdam by Wieden & Kennedy for the Hypo Vereinsbank.



Or like the Ikea commercials and the Stilwerk ads from the kitchens of

small agencies such as Grabarz & Partners and Jung von Matt am Main - a

young branch of the same Hamburg agency.



The heartwarming thing about the Hypo Vereinsbank campaign is how it

directly portrays a fundamental insight. A bank is there to take care of

its clients’ money, so that they can take care of more important

things.



Namely to enjoy life.



Everyone can identify themselves not only with this message but also

with the people in the ads.



The woman behind the flowers could have my face. Assuming I was a woman,

of course. The pictures are exciting, especially because you cannot see

people’s heads.



The layout is clear and simple. And the language is human, without any

bank jargon. Also, the term ’custom-made’ is thankfully absent.



I was fascinated with the Stilwerk campaign because it impressed me with

a simple analogy and in an intelligent way which gave me cause for

thought.



To understand this simple analogy, one must know that Stilwerk is a

collection of different furnishing houses under one roof, each having

excellent designs.



The only blip is that the typography in the ads could be better.



The Ikea commercials get their pep (a German word which comes from the

English word ’pepper’) from mocking the family morals of the 50s, when

the sexual activities of teenagers took place behind closed doors which

were kept shut by shoving furniture in front of them.



The ad is shot in the style of the typical American soap operas of the

early TV years. It starts with the title, ’Living with your parents’,

and the sub-title, ’Lesson 1’.



The story that follows is simple. Mother and father are sitting eating

breakfast in the kitchen. The fat son comes home (obviously after a long

night) and disappears into his room.



Here, the voiceover points out that he now only has to push a heavy

piece of furniture in front of the door in order to be protected against

the inconvenience of unexpected parental visits. This is an entertaining

and surprising way in which to set the Ikea range.



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