Circus ends troubled spell at IPA

Philip Circus, the outspoken legal affairs director of the Institute of Practitioners in Advertising, is to quit the agency trade body.

Philip Circus, the outspoken legal affairs director of the

Institute of Practitioners in Advertising, is to quit the agency trade

body.



He will end his 20-year tenure of the job in March to concentrate on

other activities and expand his role as an advisor to the Newspaper

Society, which is making its advertising law service available to other

organisations (Campaign, 28 November 1997).



The decision by the blunt-spoken barrister follows a number of

controversial comments which have put him at odds with the advertising

establishment.In September 1996, he went on radio and television to

criticise what he claimed was a lack of accountability at the

Advertising Standards Authority after its decision to ban the

Conservative Party’s ’demon eyes’ poster.



More recently, he is understood to have been unhappy about what he

believed was the IPA’s failure to take a more robust stance against the

Government’s assault on tobacco advertising.



It is believed that one of the reasons Circus, 46, has chosen to resign

is so that he can speak out more freely on industry issues about which

he feels strongly.



But he said: ’The overriding reason for leaving the IPA is that I’ve

been doing a full-time job which provides only a third of my income.



’David Newell, the Newspaper Society’s director, has come up with an

expanded role for me and the NS is an organisation I’ve long

admired.’



Circus currently divides his time between the IPA, the Institute of

Sales Promotion, for which he acts as legal advisor, and his partnership

in Lawmark, a marketing law advisory service.



’It was getting too much,’ he added. ’If I had stayed at the IPA, there

would have had to be a huge change in my working arrangements.’



The IPA is advertising for Circus’s replacement and may follow the

increasingly common practice of having senior positions filled by

semi-permanent consultants.



Nick Phillips, the IPA’s director-general, will serve as Circus’s

temporary replacement on the Committee of Advertising Practice, which

determines Britain’s advertising codes.



He said: ’Philip combines huge knowledge with speed of action, but he

does get frustrated at times and will always say what he thinks.’



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