Co-op gives BDDH pounds 10m retail task

The Co-operative Wholesale Society has appointed Partners BDDH, the agency behind the ethical advertising campaign of its subsidiary organisation, the Co-operative Bank, to revamp the group’s entire pounds 10 million advertising business along similar lines.

The Co-operative Wholesale Society has appointed Partners BDDH, the

agency behind the ethical advertising campaign of its subsidiary

organisation, the Co-operative Bank, to revamp the group’s entire pounds

10 million advertising business along similar lines.



CWS, which has been undergoing a shake-up since Graham Melmouth joined

as chief executive last year, was founded in the last century on the

basis of fair dealing between producer, seller and customer. But the

values underpinning its inception have seldom been emphasised in its

marketing approach.



In contrast, the Co-operative Bank has become one of the most successful

parts of the Co-operative movement by using BDDH to focus on its ethical

investment policy, as well as its services.



It emerged this week that Melmouth secretly appointed BDDH several

months ago to look into the possibility of bringing CWS’s adspend under

a single umbrella, highlighting its underlying values of openness and

honesty. Bill Shannon, the head of corporate affairs for the Co-op,

confirmed BDDH’s appointment.



CWS and its sister organisation, Co-operative Retail Services, are both

part of the Co-operative movement, but cover different areas of the

country. CRS food stores appointed Duckworth Finn Grubb Waters earlier

this year.



CWS operates 700 food stores and a variety of other outlets, from

funeral parlours to farms. Its advertising was previously handled by a

number of different regional shops, as was the media buying. Shannon

would not say whether media would also be consolidated.



Nigel Long, the managing director of BDDH, refused to comment on the

deal, except to say that any arrangement with CWS would not conflict

with the agency’s Savacentre account because the target markets of each

business were very different.



Before commenting please read our rules for commenting on articles.

If you see a comment you find offensive, you can flag it as inappropriate. In the top right-hand corner of an individual comment, you will see 'flag as inappropriate'. Clicking this prompts us to review the comment. For further information see our rules for commenting on articles.

comments powered by Disqus