Confused.com's Brian the robot incarnated as interactive toy in consumer giveaway

Confused.com's Brian the robot brand character has been brought to life outside of the firm's TV advertising, and will be given away free in the form of a physical interactive "pull-and-go" toy that speaks lines from the ads, to consumers who buy insurance through the comparison site.

Brian the robot: Confused.com's brand character
Brian the robot: Confused.com's brand character

The insurance comparison site is giving away the robot, which has been designed to appeal to adults and children, from 1 February. The offer is being promoted in a dedicated TV ad that breaks on 7 February.

The company hopes the promotion will "tip the balance" when it comes to consumers deciding who to insure with.

The Brian toy will be available to anyone who takes out a home or car insurance policy with Confused.com from 1 February.

Speaking to Marketing, Fiona Creedon, head of advertising at Confused.com, pointed out that Brian has only been a feature of the brand's ad for just a year-and-a-half, but has proved popular with consumers.

She said: "The main reason for [producing the toy] is customer demand. The last 18 months have seen lots of enquiries and expectation from customers via the customer support team who deal with customers and on social media,"

Brian regularly tweets to his 36,000 Twitter followers and also features in a free-to-download Talking Brian app, which has achieved 148,000 downloads.

Creedon said: "Brian is a unique toy – really tangible and interactive. You pull him along on his wheels and press his chest and he speaks lines from the ads. He’s also a quality toy. This was the most important thing for me and the team.

"The hope is that as insurance is a very competitive marketplace, the offer could tip the balance in our favour, in terms of choosing Confused.com over a competitor."

Creedon said the company and its manufacturer partner have produced enough Brians to ensure they can meet anticipated levels of demand.

The toy was developed by Confused.com in conjunction with promotional agency Atom Marketing.