DIARY: Advertising's finest art lover goes old-school to bring back punters

The Saatchi boys are undergoing something of a renaissance. After several years of keeping a reasonably low profile, all of a sudden the brothers are everywhere you look.

Charles, of course, is now more famous for his obsession with modern art than for anything to do with advertising. The "father of British art" has been the subject of several TV documentaries lately. He also launched the Saatchi Gallery this year, generating yards of column inches in the process.

In an attempt to boost the gallery's footfall, Charles recently came up with the mother of all promotions. It goes something like this: everybody who goes to the gallery will get a free postcard. Brilliant, isn't it?

What's going on? Here we have the most sophisticated creative of his generation reverting to one of the oldest sales promotion techniques in the book. Is this really the man whose agency gave us the iconic "Labour isn't working"?

Speaking of which, congratulations must go to Maurice Saatchi, who was this week appointed as the joint chairman of the Tory Party. Lord Saatchi's political credentials are, of course, impeccable. Not only is he the Conservative Treasury spokesman in the House of Lords, but he's also the man who persuaded the party to run the successful "Labour isn't working" campaign during the build-up to the 1979 general election.

Now that it's the Tories who aren't working, we wonder if Saatchi will be as honest about his own party.

Of course, the Conservatives are in safe hands. If there is any-one capable of devising an election campaign good enough to topple Tony Blair, it's Maurice. Rumour has it that his strategy will be based around the following idea: give a free postcard to everyone who votes Tory.

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