DIARY: Crash and Burn - Dread induced as reggae stunt provokes civic unrest

Ben Davey, Metro’s head of trading, was eager to impress when he was a young executive selling the record and entertainment slot at the Evening Standard.

Ben Davey, Metro’s head of trading, was eager to impress when he

was a young executive selling the record and entertainment slot at the

Evening Standard.



’I was going round all the record companies trying to knock out a few

ads. One was a reggae label with Shabba Ranks on its books. It said it

had a bit of money to promote Shabba, who was doing an in-store record

signing later that week. I sold them an ad but they hadn’t got any copy,

so I said I would knock some up. Back at the office, I found a Tower

Records logo and put together some copy announcing Mr Ranks’ imminent

visit to their premises in Piccadilly Circus. The problem was, I forgot

to tell the store and didn’t bother asking their permission for the use

of the logo.



’A couple of nights later, I was watching the local news on TV. It led

with a story about a riot at Tower Records in Piccadilly Circus during a

visit by Shabba Ranks, with 5,000 steamers looting the place.



’Needless to say, Tower Records didn’t see the funny side and we didn’t

carry any of their business for a while afterwards.’



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