Duckworth Finn takes IPA prize for HEA work

The Health Education Authority’s drugs education campaign is the surprise choice for the grand prix at this year’s IPA Advertising Effectiveness awards.

The Health Education Authority’s drugs education campaign is the

surprise choice for the grand prix at this year’s IPA Advertising

Effectiveness awards.



A panel of top clients chaired by Lord Marshall, the British Airways

chairman, picked the Duckworth Finn Grubb Waters work, which is in sharp

contrast to big budget winners of recent years.



The awards - presented at London’s Hilton hotel on Tuesday evening -

were the first since a major overhaul designed to make them more

relevant to clients and to counter claims that they had become out of

date.



Other winners in the highest-ranking five-star category, from which the

grand prix winner was chosen, were Army recruitment (Saatchi & Saatchi),

Colgate (Young & Rubicam), First Direct (WCRS), Marmite (BMP), Orange

(WCRS) and Volkswagen (BMP).



Orange also took the Charles Channon Award for the best contribution to

new learning, while Bartle Bogle Hegarty’s One 2 One campaign collected

the ISBA prize for the best new entrant.



The HEA campaign took the top prize for what the judges said was its

successful infiltration of ’fortress youth’ with advertising that

neither patronised nor lectured.



The win surprised some observers, given that its results were less

easily quantifiable than the hard data backing the cases of rival

contenders for the top prize.



The awards presentation was accompanied by a war cry from the main

sponsor, the Financial Times, for agencies to regain the ground being

lost to management consultants.



David Bell, the FT’s chairman, claimed that while the value of brands as

shareholder assets had become more widely accepted by the City, agencies

were not the strong brand custodians they had been in the 60s and

70s.



Brand custodians had grown more concerned with short-term market share

than long-term equity building, he said.



Editor’s comment, p25.



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