Economist extends 'Never stop questioning' TV ads into experiential push

Activity appeals to commuters' curiosity with thought-provoking questions.

The Economist has launched an interactive ad unit at London's Victoria station
The Economist has launched an interactive ad unit at London's Victoria station

The Economist is expanding its "Never stop questioning" TV advertising with an experiential campaign featuring a printer-enabled interactive screen at London's Victoria station.

Launching today (14 January) and running for four days, the display will pose some of the thought-provoking questions that appear in the latest TV ads. Rail passengers will be able to interact with each question using a button on the screen to reveal the answers.

When pressed, the button will trigger the screen's integrated printer, which will produce a preview of an article addressing the question. A QR code on the printout and on screen will enable commuters to use their smartphones to access the full article on Economist.com, where non-subscribers can register for free access to content.

Questions posed include "Does social media help or harm democracy?" and "Are plastic bags better for the ocean than paper ones?". They are designed to provoke thought among prospective readers of the title, building on The Economist's marketing strategy to cultivate a "globally curious" audience.

The experiential element of the campaign was conceived by brand experience agency Sense London.

Mark Cripps, The Economist's chief marketing officer, said: "At The Economist, we have always believed it is by posing and debating difficult questions that people, society and commerce progresses and move forward. This experience brings to life the idea that we survive and thrive by asking why.

"By consuming our content, readers will be better armed with the tools they need to prepare themselves for the future."

The Economist's TV activity, created by Proximity London, launched earlier this month.