THE EDITOR'S CUT

Editor: The argument that globalisation kills creativity seems to be borne out every day in the offices of Campaign Screen, when the latest multi-national, one-size-fits all dross falls through the door and inevitably ends up on the reject pile.

There are very few brands which have so far convinced us that global campaigns can really span borders and cultures.

Our views are then reinforced by the likes of Ikea which, unusually for a global marketer, uses different, highly creative agencies in each country. The result is a wealth of refreshing, original and brave work which the local market can identify with.

We saw evidence of its brave approach in Cannes this year when Leagas Delaney Paris won a Gold Lion for spots including a toddler playing with his mother's vibrator.

More recently, Amsterdam hotshop Strawberry Frog hit the headlines with its debut work for the brand, featuring a child with two embracing men. The controversial spot raised a rumpus by presenting the couple as parents.

The advertiser has not been afraid to address such issues in the US either. A print ad from Crispin Porter & Bogusky earlier this year showed a woman in a prison cell with an apparently 'predatory lesbian' waiting nearby.

Ikea's overarching idea is to present the brand in the context of a widespread social movement and, as such, it is not afraid to challenge convention.

Needless to say, we were inundated with great ads from Ikea this month, from France and Finland to the latest US TV work directed by king of subversive comedy, Spike Jonze.

We only wish there were more clients like Ikea, wanting to work with the hottest shops and producing ground-breaking work. It would certainly make our job easier.

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