Euro RSCG says life is great in MSN campaign

Euro RSCG Wnek Gosper reveals life’s unexpected twists in a pounds 7 million campaign for Microsoft’s internet portal, MSN.

Euro RSCG Wnek Gosper reveals life’s unexpected twists in a pounds

7 million campaign for Microsoft’s internet portal, MSN.



Four 30-second ads have been developed for the UK, featuring the new

endline: ’Life’s great - see msn.co.uk for details.’ They feature

situations which turn out to be much better than expected.



The first ad shows a nerdy shopper in a dowdy department store. He takes

a pair of polyester trousers into a changing room and strips down to

reveal his underpants and spindly body. Suddenly a buxom woman enters

announcing that all the other cubicles are taken. His nerdy life takes a

turn for the better when she removes her top to try on her outfit.



A second execution shows a lonely earthworm watching two children play

ball. He looks longingly at their friendship when suddenly a spade

descends from above and chops him in half - giving him a partner to play

with.



In the third ad, a huntsman is seen running from danger. Entering his

study, he is shocked to see a large fox behind his desk, dressed in

hunting gear. ’So we meet again, but this time under more favourable

circumstances,’ the fox sneers.



The final execution shows a woman confronted by an alien in her

garden.



Her shock turns to pleasure when the alien drops his cloak to reveal the

body of a Chippendale.



Mark Wnek, the executive creative director of Euro, said: ’This is the

first and only campaign to recognise the ultimate benefit of the net,

which is that it enriches your life. Not only is this a major step

forward in internet advertising but also in brand advertising in this

sector.’



The TV campaign, which breaks on 15 November, will be supported by

online and radio ads. The ads were written by Wnek and art directed by

Paul Shearer.



They were directed by Doug Nichols for Serious Pictures.



Last Friday, a US judge ruled that Microsoft ’harmed consumers’ in an

initial ruling in the year-long, anti-trust case against the company.