Hello! panel offers advertisers feedback on their work

Hello! magazine is offering advertisers access to the findings of a new reader panel, set up to help them evaluate the impact of their advertising in the title.

Hello! magazine is offering advertisers access to the findings of a

new reader panel, set up to help them evaluate the impact of their

advertising in the title.



The move is the brainchild of Hello!’s advertising sales and development

director, Jon Humphrey, who is keen to offer advertisers such as Chanel

and Bourjois a way of making their advertising more accountable.



More than 10,000 Hello! subscribers have recently signed up to the

reader panel and have agreed to participate in research programmes

designed to gauge the value of editorial and advertising within the

magazine.



The first study will focus on the 15 April issue of Hello! and every

advertiser in that issue will automatically be included. Results will be

available in mid-June.



A sample of 1,000 Hello! readers will be contacted and asked to supply

their feedback on a range of questions, such as which ads they

particularly like, how they rate the editorial and their readership of

the advertising content. The sample will be constructed to reflect the

basic demographics of Hello!’s NRS profile.



Access to the reader panel is free of charge and it is also available to

those advertisers who require more discrete and focused research in

relation to a particular product or service.



Humphrey said: ’I think there’s an obligation on our part to provide

advertisers with as much data as possible. All too often, advertisers

can’t make their advertising accountable and this goes some way to

addressing their concerns.’



Nigel Conway, the media planning director at the Media Centre, which

handles clients such as Chanel, said: ’This is the first time that

someone has made this sort of information available. It fuels the debate

about greater transparency and clutter and represents a step in the

right direction.’



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