IBM Watson and Kone have given one London escalator a voice on Twitter

To showcase the constant feed of data Kone uses to keep its escalators and lifts functioning, the brand teamed up with hasan & partners to give one of its London escalators a voice on Twitter.

IBM Watson and Kone have given one London escalator a voice on Twitter

The agency took the escalator's 24/7 Connected Services maintenance feed, powered by IBM Watson, and turned it into a Twitter feed at @JustAnEscalator, showcasing the escalator's "innermost thoughts". 

"We don’t pay attention to the machines that make life easier until they go wrong," Tobias Wacker, creative director at hasan & partners, said. "Artificial intelligence helps Kone interpret vast amounts of sensor data to monitor, analyse and display information in real-time, to predict resolutions to potential problems. For people who use elevators and escalators that means less waiting time and a more reliable service."

The escalator has been tweeting since November last year and has gained more than a 1,150 followers who are regularly updated on its working day and condition. 

"Escalators are the unsung heroes of cities everywhere on the planet. They move millions of people a day and they need to perform safely and smoothly. The Machine Conversations campaign demonstrates how IoT, analytics and insights can take maintenance from the ordinary to the extraordinary," Max Alfthan, executive vice president marketing and communications at Kone, said.

This campaign follows Kone's award-winning Machine Conversations campaign which gave a voice to elevators connected to the IBM Watson Internet of Things (IoT) platform. The campaign translated machine-to-machine conversations into audible, intelligible and shareable conversations.

And for those who want to get even more immersed in an escalator-like existence, the campaign has also created "the most boring VR experience in the world" - an endless escalator journey. 

"People found the Kone Machine Conversations campaign soothing, which led us to explore other ways to get machines to communicate. We have used VR in a surprising way, through an uneventful, never-ending escalator journey, while the tweets give an insight into just how much goes on inside machines to keep cities moving," Wacker said. "Also, we made it boring because it's interesting."