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IPA Diploma: Roll of Honour 2006-7 - The Essays in 30 seconds by the authors

DINOSAURS IN FUR COATS

By Amy Anderson

I believe that the advertising agency business model is outmoded in today's media landscape. Clients are looking for increasingly diverse communications solutions, and specialist agencies are stepping up to deliver this. Ad agencies claim they can deliver 360-degree thinking, but still function as a traditional advertising business model. This approach is akin to a dinosaur wearing a fur coat as an attempt at survival in the oncoming Ice Age! Agencies need to evolve or face extinction. I spoke with key people in the industry who have reworked the traditional agency structure, and used these learnings to develop three business models to show change is possible.

Mentor: Kate Harrison, head of account management, Leo Burnett

Amy Anderson (nee Blackmore), account manager, The Red Brick Road; previously at Leo Burnett

REBRANDING HUMANITY: A HISTORY OF HOW THE WORLD WAS MADE GOOD

By Anna-Maren Ashford

This is the story of the most significant and ambitious re-branding exercise of all time. Even now, in 3017, it seems incredible they ever did it. In 2010, the founders of Goodland set out on their mission to rebrand a humanity that craved happiness and well-being. Through the unlikely combination of science and branding, the greatest global consumer need of all was fulfilled, and where religion, power and wealth had failed, brands succeeded.

Mentor: Juliet Haygarth, head of communications, The Hospital Club, previously business director at Rainey Kelly Campbell Roalfe/Y&R

Anna-Maren Ashford, head of brand communications at the Conservative Party; previously at RKCR/Y&R

DISTINCTION

THE FUTURE OF BRANDS LIES IN MEMORIES OF THEIR PASTS

By Isabel Butcher

Memories enable us to make choices; what we do, how we act, and the brands we consume. Advertisers, however, place disproportionate importance on creating immediate, easily accessible memories to get their brands "remembered" in the short term. But there are many more complex facets of memories and their formation which, if understood and used, would allow brands to create more impactful and powerful memories for the longer term.

Mentor: Matt Wyatt, account planner, Leo Burnett

Isabel Butcher, former planner Leo Burnett

DISTINCTION

A BRAND NEW RELIGION

By Graeme Douglas

The future success of brands can be secured by understanding and adopting the modus operandi of arguably the most enduring and successful marketing exercise of all time: religion.

Mentor: Ben Wood, managing partner, Vizeum UK

Graeme Douglas, strategy director Carat

DDS AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING BODY OF WORK*

I BELIEVE IN MODERN TRIBES AND ANCIENT MINDS

By Ian John Edwards

We live in a world of social change. From the language we use, to the clothes we wear, we change from one generation to the next. However, our biological evolution finished around 150,000 years ago. The way in which our brains make decisions, store information and fulfil physical and emotional needs has not changed since. By understanding the universal cognitive traits which govern human behaviour, we can create enduring principles which can guide marketing.

Mentor: Henry Rowe, managing director, Carat Digital

Ian John Edwards, group strategist Mediaedge:cia; previously at Carat

PEOPLE MATTER MOST

By Anna Hellyer

The future of agencies depends on the talent they house rather than the structures they operate within. Agencies need to identify the different ways of working and thinking required for their future now and to start preparing their human capital. Focusing on the Engine Group, I have identified the core values and corresponding training methods and incentives I believe the group and its people will need if they are to achieve the greater integration they desire.

Mentor: Jo Reid, planning director, WCRS

Anna Hellyer, account director M&C Saatchi; previously at WCRS

THE AGE OF THE CONSCIENCE

By Caroline Rich

Consumers today want help in understanding how to consume "responsibly" and actively engage with brands that support this desire.

Just like the audiences they wish to court, brands are also seeking advice on how and why responsible communication can be integral to their offering.

Here are ten clear and simple steps for brands to follow in building CSR into a business model, to make them the most appealing choice to a consumer who is ever harder to attract and retain in 2007. Mentor: Kevin Chesters, planning director, Saatchi & Saatchi

Caroline Rich, senior account director Saatchi & Saatchi

BRANDS AND CONSUMER EMPOWERMENT

By Matt Sanders

The future of brands will be largely shaped and determined by their ability to evolve with the huge impact that consumer empowerment will continue to have. Technology, particularly the internet, is driving a revolution in the balance of power between consumers and brands in which consumers are becoming all the more powerful. Brands will not become redundant but their role and potency will change, with huge implications for the way they communicate and develop relationships with consumers.

Mentor: Jonathan Fowles, executive director of planning, PHD

Matt Sanders, business director, PHD Media

THE FUTURE OF BRANDS ... RELIES ON OUR ABILITY TO REUNITE THEM WITH CONSUMERS

By Stephanie Tuesley

The self-obsessed nature of brands, the ever-evolving consumer and the wrong kinds of conversations between the two, are widening the physical and ideological distance between them. To help re-connect these complex entities, I believe agencies must help brands improve their understanding of consumers. We must get to know consumers holistically and learn how to become part of their neural net. It's through this kind of understanding that we can help restore the symbiotic relationship consumers and brands once enjoyed.

Mentor: Fiona Gordon, business partner, Ogilvy & Mather

Stephanie Tuesley, senior planner, Ogilvy & Mather

FEBRUARY 18, 2012: WELCOME TO A NEW TYPE OF ADVERTISING

By Amy Wickham

Today's agency model limits our ability to be true partners to our clients. QED is a new type of agency, one that not only plans and delivers communications but also quantifies the value those communications drive. By outsourcing and broadening creative resource, upweighting planning and analysis and by ensuring the company and all its employees' pay are correlated to clients' success, the company has the unique ability to be a genuine partner to its clients and truly accountable.

Mentor: Mark Tomblin, director of strategy, TBG London

Amy Wickham, board account director Miles Calcraft Briginshaw Duffy; previously at Publicis

PRESIDENT'S PRIZE

I BELIEVE THE CHILDREN ARE OUR FUTURE

By Faris Yakob

I believe the future is already here, it's just not evenly distributed. A generation has come of age since the advent of digital media that has an intrinsically participative relationship with ideas. It needs to be catered for differently and by looking at how young people are consuming, remixing and propagating ideas, we can chart how brands will co-operate in the future and begin to change how we create ideas accordingly.

Mentor: Geoff Gray, managing director, Naked Communications

Faris Yakob, senior strategist Naked Communications

*The DDS Award for Outstanding Body of Work is awarded to the candidate with the most Distinctions across the IPA Excellence Diploma's six core modules and the highest mean score across these modules.