IPA Effectiveness Awards 2008: Bronze Award - Road Safety

SUMMARY

This paper shows how psychological techniques were used to shock Ireland into wearing seatbelts. Seatbelt wearing rates in Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland were lower than those of Great Britain. The challenge was to increase seatbelt compliance and thereby reduce road carnage and its resulting human tragedy and economic cost to the taxpayer. The strategy combined findings from research, data and psychology to dramatise the consequences of being unbelted in a car, through TV ads. The campaigns reduced the number of deaths and serious injuries without seatbelts by 29 per cent in Northern Ireland, and 46 per cent in Republic of Ireland, and generated payback of £15 per every £1 spent.

JUDGE'S COMMENT

Faced with the challenge of increasing rates of seatbelt wearers in Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, this campaign used interesting cognitive research and clever strategies to reduce the numbers of road fatalities and serious injuries. It showed clear objectives and demonstrated a large scale of effect with dramatic results.

- Roisin Donnelly, corporate marketing director, Procter & Gamble

ROAD SAFETY
Title: The longer-term effects of seatbelt advertising
Client: Department of Environment (Northern Ireland) and the Road Safety
Authority (Republic of Ireland)
Entrant: LyleBailie International
Authors: David Lyle, Julie Anne Bailie, Dawn McCartney, Robert Lyle,
David Martin, LyleBailie International
Media used: TV, national newspapers, magazines, radio, out of home

IN A NUTSHELL

Through dramatising the consequences of being unbelted in a car, the campaign reduced the number of deaths and serious injuries without seatbelts and generated a payback of £15 per every £1 spent.

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