Kerry Glazer appointed new president of Nabs

Nabs has appointed a new president as demands for its services reach six-year high.

Nabs: Tickell and Glazer (Picture: Bronac McNeill)
Nabs: Tickell and Glazer (Picture: Bronac McNeill)

Nabs, the advertising and media industry’s support organisation, has appointed AAR chief executive Kerry Glazer as its new president.

Glazer replaces Karen Blackett who will complete her two-year term this May. Glazer, who is currently present of Wacl has been instrumental in the recent #timeTo initiative to combat sexual harassment in advertising, alongside Nabs and the Advertising Association. The initiative is in the midst of analysing the results of its survey of the industry with findings and a Code of Conduct due to be published imminently.

Her appointment comes as a key moment for Nabs’ which has seen calls on its services reach record levels as the industry continues to grapple both with the emotional impact of the recession and the impact of the #MeToo movement.

Glazer will help raise further awareness of the support Nabs offers as well as helping to forge new partnerships with creative agencies.

She said: "I've been involved with Nabs for 13 years and I have seen first hand how the work Nabs does in giving support impacts people. Agencies have never been leaner and the pressure on people's time has never been greater so it is important that people are aware of the extent and range of support that Nabs provides."

Glazer is also focused on raising awareness of the support that Nabs can provide to people who have been victims of sexual harassment: "It can be difficult for people to come forward if it is someone who is senior to you who has been harrassing you. Nabs can provide support and advice if you feel vulnerable and alone."

She will also be championing Nabs focus on wellbeing. "I think we are making all the right moves [when it comes to mental wellbeing] but we need to make sure that as many people as possible understand that they can come to NABS for support," she added.

Nabs chairman Simon Daglish said he was "thrilled" by Glazer’s appointment. Daglish, who is ITV's deputy managing director, commercial, said of Glazer: "Her depth of understanding and passion for our work will really help us to meet our ambition of helping many more people across the advertising and media industry."

Diana Tickell, the chief executive of Nabs, paid tribute to the phenomenal efforts of Karen Blackett over the last two years, in particular her championing of the Working Parents initiative which offers advice, support, coaching and information to mothers and fathers in advertising.

Karen Blackett, Nabs departing president, said that "Our people are our biggest asset in this industry, which is why Nabs work to improve individual wellbeing is so important. I have really enjoyed my time as president and I am proud of what we have achieved together, particularly the Working Parents Initiative, which aims to help patents thrive at work and home."

Nabs in Numbers 

  • Nabs took 922 calls to the Advice Line in the first quarter of 2018 – that’s the highest number of calls in any quarter of the past six years.

  • Almost one-third (29%) of people calling the Advice Line in Q1 were getting in touch seeking emotional support – the biggest reason for calling – followed by requests for financial assistance (20%) and issues around redundancy (13%).

  • This sees a slight shift in the order of the second and third reasons for calling the Advice Line compared with 2017 as a whole, which saw: emotional support (26%), redundancy (20%), financial assistance (16%) as the top three reasons for calling.

  • In Q1, Nabs awarded £24,500 in grants (an average of £1,600 per grant), which went to helping mums learn digital skills which helped them remain in the industry and find greater flexibility while raising a family, as well as single parents struggling to keep up with the cost of living and people dealing with domestic abuse.

  • The top three reasons for people coming to NABS for career coaching are: 23% were at a career crossroad; 22% were seeking career development; and 12% needed help building their confidence.

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