LETTERS: NABS; Even the best are dispensable and could need NABS

I was delighted to read Ragnar Caledon’s letter (Campaign, 24 November) in which he bravely acknowledged the assistance he received from NABS. Brave because we all know how difficult it is to admit that you need help.

I was delighted to read Ragnar Caledon’s letter (Campaign, 24 November)

in which he bravely acknowledged the assistance he received from NABS.

Brave because we all know how difficult it is to admit that you need

help.



His letter highlights one of the perennial communication problems that

NABS faces. What does NABS do and whom does it help?



However hard we try to tell people that NABS assists members of the

industry with welfare grants, a helpline, a job club, employment law

advice and, on some occasions, just a friendly ear, there will always be

people who never quite believe that it has anything to do with them.



Some have told me bluntly that if people are made redundant or are

bullied, it is invariably their own fault and that they should have

realised that the communications industry was a rough, tough world where

only the fittest will survive.



All I can say in answer - and as a manager who has been forced to make a

number of people redundant - is that the fittest should prosper, but

should help those less fortunate as they do so.



We estimate that NABS has helped 12,000 people since the beginning of

the recession, more than 800 of whom are still receiving welfare grants.

In every case, our help is strictly confidential and we certainly do not

expect every recipient to write thank-you letters to Campaign. This

makes Ragnar’s letter all the more welcome.



If he has convinced even a few more people that the help NABS provides

is indeed real, then his courage will be amply rewarded.



Bruce Haines, Chairman, NABS