Lowes launches debut work for Diesel brand

Lowe Howard-Spink this week launches its first work for Diesel, the Italian clothing brand, after winning the print account in September from the Swedish incumbent, DDB Paradiset.

Lowe Howard-Spink this week launches its first work for Diesel, the

Italian clothing brand, after winning the print account in September

from the Swedish incumbent, DDB Paradiset.



The campaign takes a two-pronged approach, with one set of ads targeting

16- to 24-year-old consumers for its fashion range, and the second aimed

at older consumers who are likely to be drawn to Diesel’s Denim

Division.



The fashion campaign continues Paradiset’s long-running ’successful

living’ theme, but places more emphasis on the product. Kitsch

executions take the form of mock catalogues for items such as gardening

and car equipment, with models wearing Diesel clothes.



The denim campaign, which is darker in tone and likely to spark

controversy, is designed to communicate Diesel’s expertise in both the

design and manufacture of denim.



One ad shows a fat, naked woman during a liposuction operation. The

nurses are clad in Diesel slim-fit jackets. The copy reads: ’Dump the

chocolate fudge ice-cream, hide the burgers, shed that excess weight.

It’ll all be worth it for our slim-fit jackets. They’re tailored tight

on the body and longer in the sleeves. Remember no pain, no gain.’



A second ad shows an elderly woman wearing dirty denim jeans, grabbing

the crotch of her sleeping husband, also clad in jeans. The copy reads:

’Only the finest quality 12.5oz denim is good enough for Diesel. This is

overdyed, then washed and finally distressed. The result is antique,

dirty denim that has an aged, vintage appearance. A bit like your

grandmother.’



Other executions feature the Virgin Mary wearing jeans and a man hacking

a plastic mannequin to bits.



Both campaigns, which break at the end of January in the style press, on

48- and six-sheet posters and on cross-tracks, will be backed by a

dollars 20 million spend and will run in more than 30 countries.



The fashion campaign was written by Tony Miller and art directed by Gary

Anderson, with photography by Sandro Sodano. The denim executions were

written and art directed by Adrian Lim and Steve Williams

respectively.



They were shot by Erwin Olaf.