M&C Saatchi reveals second leg of Foster’s campaign

Foster’s has created a spoof of a German kidnap drama in the latest commercial aimed at distancing the lager brand from the previous much-criticised ’tickle it, you wrigglers’ campaign.

Foster’s has created a spoof of a German kidnap drama in the latest

commercial aimed at distancing the lager brand from the previous

much-criticised ’tickle it, you wrigglers’ campaign.



The 40-second film, produced by M&C Saatchi, makes its national TV debut

during the film, the Pelican Brief, on Saturday.



It marks the second phase of the ’he who drinks Australian, thinks

Australian’ advertising which has tried to show laid-back Australian

humour transcending national boundaries.



M&C Saatchi has been attempting to bring consistency and focus to

Foster’s advertising, which has had a succession of false starts since

Paul Hogan fronted the campaign in the 80s.



The Scottish Courage brand set out on its new advertising course in May

with commercials that transferred an Australian sense of humour to comic

situations set in Italy, France and Mexico.



The 40-second spot - shot with Geman actors and using English subtitles

- begins in a seemingly high-tension situation as a German tycoon, whose

wife has been kidnapped, waits with the police for her abductors to make

contact by phone.



When they do, he pleads to speak to his wife. But when she comes to the

phone, he only wants to know where she has put his golf clubs.



The film was written by Sue Higgs, art directed by Steve Paskin and

directed by Daniel Kleinman for Spectre.



Nick Hurrell, the M&C Saatchi joint chief executive, said: ’Producing a

long-running campaign is a bit like the music business. The second album

is always the hardest and the true test of a good campaign is being able

to produce good ads the second time around.’



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