MARKETING TECHNIQUE: TOP SALES PROMOTION AGENCIES - What they are saying

ROBERT JANES, president, Carlson: ’I believe the profit has gone out of this industry. Agencies employ well-educated graduates, give them a car, and then charge less for their time than you would charge for a plumber. These companies are not charging realistic fees. They then try to make up the difference elsewhere. I don’t believe that is healthy.’

ROBERT JANES, president, Carlson: ’I believe the profit has gone

out of this industry. Agencies employ well-educated graduates, give them

a car, and then charge less for their time than you would charge for a

plumber. These companies are not charging realistic fees. They then try

to make up the difference elsewhere. I don’t believe that is

healthy.’



IAIN FERGUSON, chairman, KLP Marketing: ’The industry is in good

shape.



Most importantly, clients have decided to get more bangs for their buck

by investing in below-the-line marketing. They now get better returns

both immediately and long-term by shifting money out of thematic

advertising.



This is a trend you see in the US and western Europe, as well as

here.’



JOHN QUARREY, chief executive, IMP: ’As an industry, we have a fantastic

opportunity. Clients are asking us to do different things, and the staff

are keen to respond. The kind of people who work in below-the-line never

want to stand still. They look for opportunities to grow and

diversify.



And standards are rising. The new intake of graduates are the best we

have ever recruited.’



JON CLAYDON, founding director, Claydon Heeley: ’I think we are good for

the sector because we are different. It is important for the business

that there is young talent coming through. The goalposts are shifting

all the time, and it is important to show there is a new wave. And we

are massively ambitious. We are interested in acquisition, all those

things.



Watch this space!’



MARK BEASLEY, managing director, Perspectives: ’People talk about

polarisation of agencies, but clients are polarising, too - between

those, on the one hand, who want long-term strategic relationships and

those, on the other, seeking short-term tactical supply. Like many

agencies, we want to invest in the former and divest ourselves of the

latter.’



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