MEDIA: THE BUSINESS: AN EXPERT’S VIEW - The Business does not live up to the FT’s high editorial standards, Iain Jacob says

Saturday morning after a bruising week. It’s a precious time for the overworked professional - this is when you are ready to be inspired.

Saturday morning after a bruising week. It’s a precious time for

the overworked professional - this is when you are ready to be

inspired.



Perhaps this weekend you will crack the idea which delivers that elusive

mortgage-free future.



About 490,000 of you turn to the Financial Times on Saturday for that

inspiration. Before the FT introduced its new magazine, The Business, it

was already a great read.



Concise news, the best personal finance in the business and a great

weekend section on the arts.



So as I turned to The Business, my expectations were high. It’s good but

not great. I’m giving it a ’hold, bordering on buy’ recommendation.



From the house of the FT, I expect the best.



When you first pick up the title, it does look the business.



The design is superb and puts the competition to shame. It is modern and

sharp without using silly typographical trickery, and has a distinctive

and appealing identity.



So now I’m up for a decent read and there, as they say, is the rub.

Don’t get me wrong, there were some good articles in this week’s

edition. The feature on Nokia, the storm-trooper of the mobile telecoms

market that single-handedly reversed the economic fortunes of Finland,

was fascinating.



And the piece on Steve Shirley was equally compelling. She changed her

name from Stephanie to Steve to make pounds 63 million in the

male-dominated software market. Her company reports don’t just talk

about management innovation - she’s been doing it for more than 35

years.



But as I read on, I felt that The Business was schizophrenic. I was

moving from what makes a great leader to what makes a great butternut

squash risotto.



If any title in the UK has well-defined reader interests, it has to be

the FT. I was looking for something that focused on business, innovation

and the people that actually make the millions rather than dream about

them.



So, the magazine looks great and there are some good reads. With more

confidence, as the title evolves, it could turn a ’hold’ into a

’must-buy’ recommendation.



Publisher Financial Times

Cover price Financial Times on Saturday, 85p

Frequency Weekly

Circulation 230,000

Ad rate full-page colour pounds 8,000

Advertisers include Mitsubishi, Lexus, Peugeot, Austin Reed, Egg, Bang &

Olufsen, Habitat



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