Media: Double Standards - Revealing on-air nightmares and dream guests

TalkSPORT's Alan Brazil and Sky's Tim Lovejoy have brought an irreverent style to their sports shows. They talk about sporting heroes, voiceovers and on-air cock-ups.

TIM LOVEJOY - PRODUCER AND PRESENTER, SOCCER AM, SKY SPORTS 1

- What is your favourite part of the show?

Showboat is mine, but I know the viewers - male and female - love the Soccerette. It's like a little surprise or treat every week.

- What is the appeal of your show to non-football fans?

The Soccerette.

- Describe your programme's average viewer/listener?

Good looking, funny, intelligent. Winners.

- How seriously do you take ratings and do they ever keep you up at night?

If I'm honest, I'm the luckiest producer in the world as my bosses never discuss ratings with me and have never put any pressure on the show at all to perform better. The freedom I have is rare in TV and I think the show has benefited from this.

- Which other shows and presenters have influenced your approach and how?

I am from the first generation of children with remote controls, so I'm like a sponge, influenced by thousands of TV shows. This has also led to a short concentration span and the need to flick the channels constantly.

- Have you ever done an advertising voiceover? If so, who was it for?

Recently, I did one for Pringles to run during the World Cup and one for HP Sauce, "The official sauce of Great Britain".

- What has been your biggest on-air cock-up?

I've done loads, but they all add to the show. However, last season during the live draw for the LDV trophy which we host, I dropped all the cards on the floor and there had to be a redraw. I was mortified and still have nightmares about it now.

- If you hadn't gone into presenting, what would you have done?

I think I would have been drawn towards the music industry, not performing, but working for the labels. I have friends in the business and it seems like a great job.

- Who is your dream guest and what would you do to entice them on to the show?

Jose Mourinho. He's the biggest star in English football at the moment. I know he watches, so watch this space.

- Who is the most interesting sports personality you've interviewed and why?

Before I worked at Sky, I interviewed the basketball player Shaquille O'Neal when he was playing for the "Dream Team II" in Toronto. The size, the athleticism and the profile were all enormous. I felt quite insignificant as a man next to him.

- Who is your greatest sporting hero?

At the moment, Jose Mourinho. That man can do no wrong.

ALAN BRAZIL - former footballer and presenter, Sports Breakfast Show, talkSPORT

- What is your favourite part of the show?

My favourite part of the show would have to be Transit, which is on for the last hour of my morning show. It's a current-affairs programme but on Fridays, we change it and play old songs. I love going back in time and it brings back great memories. Hopefully the listeners like it too.

- What is the appeal of your show to non-football fans?

If anything serious happens we'll cover it. Despite my show being primarily about sport, it is informative. I'm well up for covering serious news events.

- Describe your programme's average viewer/listener?

When I get in a taxi, nine times out of ten the taxi driver is listening. The age group can be anything between 18 and 36, which is a nice range but I'd like to think it appeals to any age group. My show is very popular with taxi drivers in London and Glasgow and white-van drivers.

- How seriously do you take ratings and do they ever keep you up at night?

Very interested but I don't lose sleep over it. Obviously, if my six-month ratings were to drop that would be very serious and I'd be very worried. I think the Rajar system is ridiculous. I don't know anyone who fills in a diary. I've never met one person who does.

- Which other shows and presenters have influenced your approach and how?

I used to do a lot of driving and I love my football. I like Ken Bruce on BBC Radio 2, who is very witty and informative.

- Have you ever done an advertising voiceover? If so, who was it for?

I've done a few and the one that stands out was a radio ad for a hair product called Regain. I did the ad with pal Ray Wilkins, the former England international footballer. It was a good laugh and very simple to do.

- What has been your biggest on-air cock-up?

I once did a live interview with a journalist in South Africa for a forthcoming Cricket World Cup and I remarked that it must be great having Hansie Cronje, the former South African cricket captain, back in the team. The journalist said it would be if he wasn't dead. I cringed as I realised he had been killed in a plane crash a few weeks earlier. I think I was skiing at the time and I missed the news reports.

- If you hadn't gone into presenting, what would you have done?

Without doubt I would have gone into horse-racing as a breeder. I grew up in Ipswich while I was a lad training with Ipswich Town as a professional footballer and I really got the bug for the sport around this time.

- Who is your dream guest and what would you do to entice them on to the show?

If it was someone from the world of football, I would have to say Kenny Dalglish. Kenny is one of my heroes. I've always been an admirer of golf's Seve Ballesteros as well.

- Who is the most interesting sports personality you've interviewed and why?

George Foreman. I'm not a massive boxing fan but it was fascinating talking to him about his career. He's had such a colourful life from being born into a large, poor family in Texas to becoming heavyweight champion of the world and taking up religion and becoming a preacher.

- Who is your greatest sporting hero?

Maradona. I've never met him but Ossie Ardiles, his old team-mate, tells me he was a magician on the pitch and after his well-documented problems in his personal life he's now back on form. I love watching golf and tennis so anyone from those sports and I've always admired horse-racing's Lester Piggott.