Media Lifeline: House & Garden

The popularity of the UK's best-selling lifestyle glossy shows no signs of abating.

1947: House & Garden, originally launched as an architecture title in the US in 1901, had initially crossed the Atlantic in 1920, when it became a section within the UK edition of Vogue. This section was discontinued during the Second World War, but the brand returns with a peacetime bang in 1947, launching as a standalone quarterly, priced three shillings.

1951: In 1950, it increases its frequency to every other month, then, in February 1951, it becomes a monthly, still at a coverprice of three shillings. A stable of writers including Hugh Casson, Harold Nicholson and Evelyn Waugh is joined by new contributors including Nancy Mitford, Vita Sackville-West and Yehudi Menhuin.

1963: The magazine's publisher, Conde Nast, acquires Wine & Food, the house journal of The Wine and Food Society, and the new property is merged with House & Garden. The title has carved a niche for itself as an interiors and lifestyle title, in contrast to the more austere approach of its US counterpart.

1994: Susan Crewe, the second cousin to the Duke of Devonshire and known as the author of Jennifer's Diary for Harpers & Queen, is appointed editor. She embarks on a modernisation programme, majoring on the title's lifestyle elements.

October 2007: With circulation now at 141,074, making it the UK's best-selling lifestyle glossy, House & Garden celebrates its 60th birthday with an issue featuring the interior designers John Fowler and David Hicks, plus tips on refurbishing one's French chateau.

Fast forward ...

2020: A continuing property boom, especially at the top end of the market, fuels vigorous circulation growth - which by now has easily surpassed the 250,000 mark. The outlook is far less rosy at Vogue, thanks to new Puritanism and a collapse in the couture sector - so the Vogue brand is now reconfigured as a fashion section within House & Garden.