MEDIA: NOVA - AN EXPERT’S VIEW. Nova has risen again after 25 years and still manages to be hip, Lucy Meredith says

When Campaign asked me to review a new magazine aimed at ’young, sassy, tuned-in sort of chicks’, I was petrified I would be found out.

When Campaign asked me to review a new magazine aimed at ’young,

sassy, tuned-in sort of chicks’, I was petrified I would be found

out.



I was even more worried when I was told the subject of my piece was to

be the relaunch of the 60s magazine Nova - after all, I am a 70s

child.



Images of cheesecloth, headscarves and terrible perms immediately sprung

to mind and I realised that this could prove even more difficult than I

first thought.



But Nova promises ’a different kind of fashion magazine’ with ’no

crap’.



So I, for one, was willing to give it a go.



I was hoping to get some insight into the relaunch of this 60s magazine

from the opening editorial. But oh no. What I got was ten facetious

multiple choice questions on diet, feminism and relationships which were

supposed to make me realise how lucky I was to have found this source of

wisdom and individuality. It was almost enough to make me throw it in

the bin with the other glossy mags telling us how to live our wonderful

twentysomething lives.



Fortunately, I had to turn the page and read on for the sake of

Campaign, because the patronising opening gambit was to be a mere

blip.



The writing is strong and original. There is everything from a piece on

’Cunning Stunts’ (yes, that’s supposed to be a Spoonerism) to rubber in

the bathroom and ’Trannyspotting’.



But there are also some serious articles on women’s take on contemporary

issues, the Harlem ’ghetto’ and an analysis of the state of revolution

in this millennium.



An interview with the French starlet Vanessa Paradis shows how

interviews should be done - none of that PR-generated mush but a real

dig around someone’s head. Lovely.



Yes, on the fashion front, there is the ubiquitous bikini piece but Nova

gets away with it because it’s Stephanie Seymour strutting her

stuff.



A piece on customised jeans proved inspiring (if you like that kind of

thing) and the take on the current 80s look was given an edge with the

use of Oscar-nominated Chloe Sevigny. However, using computer-generated

images to showcase the latest designer frocks was going a little too far

- these girls have nothing on Jessica Rabbit.



Nova is more than a run-of-the-mill fashion magazine. While it has all

the necessary aspirational qualities, it is also realistic, stimulating

and thought-provoking. For once, here is a magazine that is

non-judgmental - the reader is treated as an individual instead of being

bombarded with dictats on why our lives should be better.



I think Nova will succeed and I am not just saying that to make me a

sassy, tuned-in sort of chick.



Opinion, p35.





Sassy, tuned-in Lucy Meredith is the marketing director of Leagas

Delaney.





Publisher: IPC Cover price pounds 2.60



Frequency: Monthly



Target circulation: 80,000



Full-page colour ad: pounds 9,000



Advertisers include: Gucci, Dolce & Gabbana, Harvey Nichols, Seiko.



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