Media: Things we like

FAST-FOOD OFFERS

God bless the cut-throat desire of Burger King and McDonald's to out-do each other at any cost. Their regular cheap burger offers keep many a greedy, poorly paid journalist happy without denting their pockets.

Deals such as Burger King's Bacon Double Cheeseburger for 99p or buy-one-get-one-free Big Macs are genius marketing ploys. We're less sure, though, about BK's King Kong promotion, which required us to utter the humiliating phrase "Kong my Whopper" to get extra ingredients.

OBSERVER WOMAN

The Observer's new women's magazine follows in the tradition of its other well-put-together monthly supplements. Light-hearted editorial, some spiky features and a sprinkling of celebrity and fashion made it a great Sunday morning flick-through and, later, a proper read. The Berliner format of the newspaper also makes the whole thing feel far more manageable and different layouts tempt you to delve into sections that previously have headed straight for the recycling box.

BBC COVERAGE OF THE WORLD DARTS CHAMPIONSHIPS, LAKESIDE

Even those who think darts is a tedious non-sport for globular old men in bad shirts will have been glued to their sofas by Sunday's epic tussle between the world champion, Raymond van Barneveld, and the flashy young pretender, Jelle Klaasen. After 11 sets of sweaty, smoky, beer-fuelled tension, Lakeside erupted when the 21-year-old Klaasen became the youngest champ ever with a "check-out" so swift he'd won before the commentators could whisper: "And this for the title."

THE NEW SERIES OF SHAMELESS

Channel 4's comedy drama continues to be one of the finest things on television. Two episodes in, the writers have managed to pull off the trick of maintaining the show's filthy hilarity despite the departure of its key characters Steve and Fiona. Brilliant moments from the early episodes include Frank's karaoke performances, Debbie pretending that her younger brother Liam had a fatal disease and Kev's sister turning Frank's house into a brothel. We can't help switching over to E4 to catch next week's episode early.

AND ONE THING WE DON'T ...

NEWS OF THE WORLD'S SVEN STORY

Or, more accurately, seven pages reporting England's head coach's numerous and idiotic comments during a staged meeting with a "fake Sheikh". Everyone knows Eriksson is prone to media blunders, so this article, which may have sold a few extra papers, proved nothing new. It only succeeded in unsettling four of the national team's top players and denting everybody's morale just five months before the World Cup, damaging the Screws' patriotic credentials at the same time.