Media: Things we like

TESCO'S "WE'RE SORRY" PRESS ADS

We've seen several examples lately of companies dropping the PR ball when letting customers down (Cadbury and Bernard Matthews spring to mind) and Tesco looked to be the latest in line when petrol from some of its stores in the South-East caused customers' cars to break down. However, the supermarket has belatedly bounced back with a nicely worded press campaign that hits all the right notes and manages to reassure while apologising.

THE ARCADE FIRE'S NEW ALBUM

We're big fans of the Canadian band which seems to have so many members that the term "collective" would a better description. Their new album, Neon Bible, sounds even better than their previous effort Funeral and manages to provide a few more upbeat moments amid the North American angst; one track sounds uncannily like Bruce Springsteen (no bad thing in our book). Their UK gigs have sold out quicker than Take That's and you can expect to hear their new tracks all over Sky Sports sequences in future.

LOADED'S "3D ISSUE"

Men's magazines have been through the wringer lately so it's good to see IPC Media offering some genuine innovation in the sector. The April issue of Loaded comes bagged with some 3D specs and tons of printed and DVD content shot in 3D. Sitting at your desk squinting through a pair of goggles at a 3D centrefold might not be a good look, but top marks to IPC for trying something new.

THE SUSPENSION OF ITV PLAY

While we hope that ITV's "security audit" isn't too damaging to the likes of Ant and Dec's Saturday Night Take-away on ITV1, maybe phone-in quizzes are about to enter their final days. We certainly hope so. The flawed formula of inane questions, endless promises of cash prizes, bored-looking presenters wittering on for hours and hefty charges only to be told you're not through means this type of telly won't be missed from our screens. In fact, we hope it stays off-air forever.

AND ONE THING WE DON'T ...

VIRGIN MEDIA'S THREAT OF LEGAL ACTION AGAINST SKY

We fully understand that Virgin Media has to do something in the battle against Sky over carriage of its channels such as Sky One, but its threat of legal action surely isn't good for anybody concerned. This could escalate a comical, and at times personal, PR battle into an extended stand-off that harms both viewers and advertisers. Clearly, both sides are to blame for this and they should really grow up and negotiate a solution before the case hits the courts.