Media: Things we like

FLORA'S TAXI ADVERTISING

We don't know quite what the taxi drivers make of it, but we are big fans of the Flora "Love Your Heart" executions that seem to be running on half of London's black cabs. It's a brilliant piece of counter-intuitive advertising - there's nothing quite like hailing a cab with "Here's a tip, why not walk" emblazoned across it in giant letters to make you think twice about what you're doing.

ANTONY GORMLEY'S "BLIND LIGHT" EXHIBITION

The latest attraction at the revamped Hayward Gallery on London's South Bank is artist and sculpture Antony Gormley's exhibition, which centres on his "Blind Light" installation - a brightly lit room full of vapour. This disorienting, but uplifting experience is alone almost worth the £8 entrance fee, but there is other new and archived work from Gormley to complete the show. His huge "Space Station" structure is definitely worth a look.

THE CONRAD BLACK TRIAL

Regardless of the outcome, and we're trying to see this one from both sides, the trial of the former Telegraph chairman Conrad Black on charges of fraud and racketeering is throwing up some fascinating allegations. Following on from business trips to Bora Bora some of the recent detail involves allegations that Black renovated a Manhattan apartment with tasteful decoration including a Napoleonic shaving basin and Indian marble sculpture. They don't make newspaper bosses like Black anymore.

VERNON IN CORONATION STREET

We've been enjoying Coronation Street's latest comic creation, Vernon, for quite some time now but he's currently creating new levels of bathos. The ageing lad, engaged to ageing tart Liz McDonald (who is cheating on him with the drayman), is lazy, incompetent and seemingly addicted to Newton & Ridley bitter. His pathetic bids at musical fame via his band, the Rhythm Rascals, are constantly entertaining and a welcome balance to the current hard hitting storylines.

AND ONE THING WE DON'T ...

PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: AT WORLD'S END

God, this film sucks. Even the likes of Johnny Depp and a cameo from Keith Richards can't save it from turkey status. It's almost three hours long, tedious and the plot doesn't add up. It's inexcusable to muck up a pirate film, which at the very least should be good swashbuckling fun for the family. But a trip to the local cinema left both kids and adults equally bored and bemused as to why, beyond the millions that Disney has creamed out of the franchise, this film ever got made?