Media: Things we like

VANITY FAIR'S 'MOVIES ROCK' SUPPLEMENT

Vanity Fair's supplements are usually lavish affairs, and its spring effort, themed around music in Hollywood, doesn't disappoint. There's some great writing and features, and a cover featuring Bill Murray dressed as Elvis. Highlights include a piece on the making of Saturday Night Fever and a look at Martin Scorsese's new Rolling Stones film. This is mainly a great reader benefit, but it has also attracted strong advertising from the likes of Paul Smith, Chanel and Selfridges.

INDEPENDENT.CO.UK

The Independent has given its website a timely revamp. It's now more colourful, there's better navigation and there's also the welcome addition of a music downloads store. Readers can visit a new IndyBest microsite with the top news stories and features. There's a bestsellers chart, new releases and the chance to watch music videos. In addition, there's a voting tool, and visitors to the site are invited to join discussions on issues of the day. Maybe its more established rivals will take some inspiration.

CARLSBERG'S LATEST SPONSORSHIP

Carlsberg's decision to splash its famous ad slogan "probably" across the front of the FA Cup minnows Havant and Waterlooville's shirts in their fourth-round clash against Liverpool was inspired. The underdogs, who included a binman and a cabbie among their ranks, might have eventually lost, but Carlsberg (which sponsors both teams, as well as being a second-tier sponsor of the FA Cup itself) made the most of what was a win-win situation by perfectly encapsulating the giantkilling spirit of the competition.

THE RETURN OF CURB YOUR ENTHUSIASM

We're big fans of the Larry David sitcom, and its return to More4 on Monday nights hasn't disappointed. Now in its sixth season, the show's blend of embarrassing situations and well-observed humour is still delivering. The series began with Larry being pressurised by his wife to take a family of hurricane victims into his home, and a succession of mishaps soon followed. Long may it continue.

AND ONE THING WE DON'T ...

THE HYPE AROUND QTRAX

Early in the week, stories in the national press appeared heralding the greatness of Qtrax, an online music downloading service that offers legal downloads of up to 25 million tracks. The articles claimed that Qtrax had signed deals with four major record companies and would be funded by blue-chip advertisers, with a chunk of the ad revenue being returned to music companies and artists. The only problem? The record companies issued statements denying having yet reached agreement with Qtrax, making its site rather less exciting than the announcement claimed.