Nationalists use YouTube to target non-voters in Scotland

LONDON - The Scottish National Party is to target non-voters with a viral and webcast campaign, which will be aired on YouTube, in its efforts to win elections in May.

The SNP has used Golley Slater to create a series of monthly webcasts for SNP leader Alex Salmond as part of his campaign to be elected First Minister of the Scottish Parliament in the Holyrood elections on May 3.

Each webcast will feature a different part of Scotland and a specific aspect of the campaign. The SNP campaign could lead to the break-up of the Union if it is successful in ousting Labour and goes on to launch an independence bid.

Its campaign slogan says "It's time: time to remove Labour and install a more dynamic, more trusted leadership; it's time to consider Scotland's place in the world; time to bring about a wealthier, healthier, safer Scotland".

Chris Lovell, chief executive of Golley Slater, said: "The SNP campaign will be positive and inclusive, utilising new media channels such as YouTube to involve parts of society least likely to engage with the political process."

David Cameron recently broadcast a series of webchats on TouTube in a PR attempt to portray himself as a working father who still does mundane household chores such as the washing-up.

In the 1992 US elections Bill Clinton successfully tuned into non-voters by going on MTV in an attempt to appeal to younger non-voters.

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