NEWS: Advertisers hit out at papers for unfair mandate on colour repro

National newspaper publishers are about to come under intensified fire from the UK’s biggest press advertisers over what is claimed to be the restrictive practices used in the supply of colour reproduction services.

National newspaper publishers are about to come under intensified fire

from the UK’s biggest press advertisers over what is claimed to be the

restrictive practices used in the supply of colour reproduction

services.



A letter will arrive next week at the offices of the Newspaper

Publishers Association from the Incorporated Society of British

Advertisers which, for ten months, has waged a campaign to end the

practice of forcing clients to use a single supplier repro house.



By railroading clients into using a single repro house, publishers force

advertisers running a national press campaign in five papers to deal

with five different houses.



According to ISBA, the practice incurs a significant accumulative

expense and so makes the use of press less attractive to advertisers.



ISBA’s letter has been signed by Barclays Bank, the Lloyds TSB Group,

NatWest, the Halifax, Procter and Gamble, Spillers and Nestle among

others. The move is backed by the Institute of Practitioners in

Advertising.



Dominic Owens, marketing services manager at Mercury Communications and

the head of the ISBA press committee, commented: ‘We are trying to point

out to the NPA that it is not a very clever way to encourage clients to

advertise in the national press. The long-term effect could be that

clients question whether to run press ads so frequently.’



Tim Hannon, creative services director of BMP DDB and chairman of the

IPA’s creative services committee, said the move was the culmination of

months of unfruitful campaigning. ‘Newspaper publishers have made no

effort,’ he said.



David Pollock, a director of the NPA, said: ‘This is a matter to be

addressed by individual newspaper publishers - that is what the NPA

executive decided.’



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