NEWS: AMV ad puts Mars in boxed chocolate arena

Mars is poised to begin national advertising to support its first venture into the UK boxed chocolates market, which is dominated by Cadbury’s Roses and Nestle’s Quality Street.

Mars is poised to begin national advertising to support its first

venture into the UK boxed chocolates market, which is dominated by

Cadbury’s Roses and Nestle’s Quality Street.



Abbott Mead Vickers BBDO has produced a TV commercial to support the new

line - called Celebrations - which went on air this week in the Tyne

Tees area before a probable national roll-out early next year.



The test campaign will allow Mars marketers to assess its performance in

the run-up to Christmas, when sales of boxed chocolates traditionally

reach their peak. Its aim, however, is to broaden the appeal of

Celebrations and maintain sales levels outside the festive season.



Sue Garrard, the Abbott Mead account director on the business, said:

‘Our hope is Celebrations won’t be like Roses and Quality Street, which

you give to your granny every Christmas, but will become a line that

children in particular will love.’



Mars has been planning to launch into the UK boxed chocolates sector

since last year’s agency realignment, which resulted in the BBDO network

being added to its global agency roster.



Abbott Mead won the assignment in competition with DMB&B, also a Mars

roster agency.



Celebrations, which is produced specifically for the UK market, contains

a number of Mars products in miniature form, from mini Mars bars to

Maltesers, Snickers, Galaxy, Bounty and Topic.



The miniaturisation theme is picked up in a 30-second commercial which

pokes fun at the Japanese obsession with all things small, including a

TV on a ring and an earring that doubles as a radio.



The film was written by Pat Doherty, art directed by Greg Martin and

directed by John McFarlane through Great Guns. Media buying on

Celebrations is being channelled through MediaCom.



‘The new work is contemporary, hip and fun,’ Garrard added. ‘It gets

right away from traditional chocolate advertising.’