NEWS: AMV unveils Govt anti-speeding drive

Abbott Mead Vickers BBDO has used poignant home-video footage of child road accident victims in a new Government initiative to reduce the number of youngsters killed by speeding drivers.

Abbott Mead Vickers BBDO has used poignant home-video footage of child

road accident victims in a new Government initiative to reduce the

number of youngsters killed by speeding drivers.



In its first work as the Central Office of Information’s roster agency,

AMV has secured the co-operation of bereaved parents for a campaign that

hammers home the human cost of a fatal accident involving a child.



The Government is putting pounds 2 million behind a three-week TV and

radio campaign in an attempt to cut the 160 child pedestrian deaths a

year that are caused by motorists breaking the speed limit.



Three commercials - a 90-second film and two 40-second versions - broke

nationally on Tuesday. They contrast camcorder shots of children

enjoying themselves with sombre poems about death written by W. H.

Auden, Christina Rossetti and Walter de la Mare. These are read by the

actors, Michael Gambon and Juliet Stevenson.



The Government initiative follows research carried out by AMV among

1,000 adults that found speeding was regarded as no more serious an

offence than illegal parking or failing to buy a TV licence.



The parents of victims will also talk about their loss in a series of

radio spots.



AMV’s chief executive, Michael Baulk, said: ‘There’s a terrifying

dissonance between perception and reality. The fact is that the real

damage isn’t done by hooligans in stolen cars on motorways, but ordinary

people.’



The ads were written by David Hieatt and art directed by Rob Oliver.

Baulk said they were designed to overcome the problem of ‘gore fatigue’

by focusing on the grief caused by the death of a child.



Baulk commented: ‘Home videos are a powerful way to get the message

across.’



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