NEWS: Burton to target ‘new lads’ via Mellors Reay

Burton is taking the blokish route in new national advertising which pitches the menswear chain at men who behave badly.

Burton is taking the blokish route in new national advertising which

pitches the menswear chain at men who behave badly.



In work that distances the retailer from its old reputation as the

manufacturer of the post-war demob suit, the ads employ ‘testosterone-

soaked imagery’, including the new lad bonding rite - the communal pee.



Mellors Reay and Partners has drafted in David Bailey, the icon of 60s

fashion photography, to shoot the four executions in which the new male

culture is contrasted with the strapline: ‘Burton. Gentlemen’s

Outfitter.’



Written by John Elsom and art directed by Ken Sara, the black-and-white

ads are part of a pounds 1.5 million campaign on 48-sheet posters,

magazines and supplements intended to lure potential customers who would

not previously have thought of going to Burtons.



Paul Richards, the managing director of Mellors Reay’s, said: ‘Burton

for blokes sums up what the campaign is all about. Burton has changed

enormously in the last two years.’



One of the ads features a man’s exposed upper back, his clothes pulled

up to reveal a tattoo in which a snake curls around a bloodied dagger.



In another, a tearful scissor-wielding woman shreds a man’s tie. A third

execution shows a woman dressed only in a shirt and tie being held

seductively by a naked man.



Richards claimed research showed the ads would not alienate existing

customers and said he did not expect to attract criticism.



‘The ads aren’t so much politically incorrect as realistic,’ he added.

‘They just reflect what’s going on in society.’



Before commenting please read our rules for commenting on articles.

If you see a comment you find offensive, you can flag it as inappropriate. In the top right-hand corner of an individual comment, you will see 'flag as inappropriate'. Clicking this prompts us to review the comment. For further information see our rules for commenting on articles.

comments powered by Disqus