NEWS: Dorlands focuses on children in Unicef ads

Unicef is celebrating its 50th birthday with an advertising campaign aimed at pricking the consciences of governments about the plight of underprivileged children.

Unicef is celebrating its 50th birthday with an advertising campaign

aimed at pricking the consciences of governments about the plight of

underprivileged children.



Bates Dorland in London has produced TV and print work with the message

that children are the powerless victims of adult decisions.



The print work underlines the message by featuring the work of

photojournalists, including a shot of a seven-year-old boy conscripted

into the Angolan army.



As such images are more difficult to get past TV regulators, the TV work

takes a softer approach by creating a news channel fronted by children,

reporting on how adult decisions affect them.



The aim of the campaign is partly to raise awareness of Unicef, but

mainly to provoke government action.



Ray Ingram, the account director for Unicef at Dorlands, said around 180

countries had signed the Convention on the Rights of a Child, but some

haven’t acted on its aims.



The campaign is expected to appear in more than 60 languages throughout

1997 and will rely extensively on free space and airtime, with Zenith

Media Worldwide responsible for negotiations.



The print work was written by James von Leyden and art directed by Andy

Ward. The TV film, directed by Chris Bould for Talkback, was written by

Daniel Bryant and art directed by Lynda Kennedy.



Before commenting please read our rules for commenting on articles.

If you see a comment you find offensive, you can flag it as inappropriate. In the top right-hand corner of an individual comment, you will see 'flag as inappropriate'. Clicking this prompts us to review the comment. For further information see our rules for commenting on articles.

comments powered by Disqus