NEWS: Drink-drive work targets young men

DMB&B kicks off the Christmas assault on drink-driving this week, with a chilling TV commercial for the Department of Transport.

DMB&B kicks off the Christmas assault on drink-driving this week, with a

chilling TV commercial for the Department of Transport.



The film shows a young woman with deep facial scars sitting at a

dressing table looking in the mirror. As she removes her make-up she

tells the viewer that Nick, her boyfriend, still feels bad about the

accident, although she accepts she must also take some of the blame

because she got in the car with him - ‘not that he was drunk’.



She says: ‘Sometimes I think he’s only with me because he feels guilty.’

After a pause, she ponders: ‘Then again, I wonder if I’m only with him

because I’m scared I won’t get anyone else.’



The campaign’s strategy is to add to social condemnation of drink-

driving while targeting 17- to 24-year-old men - a group that suffers

the highest casualties through drink-driving. The ad, written by Steve

Boswell and art directed by Steve Drysdale, has the endline: ‘If you are

out for a drink, leave the car at home.’



A national poster campaign, using the image of the girl from the ad, has

the line: ‘Not everyone needs a reminder of drinking and driving.’



The radio execution, written by Steve Meredith and Ray Brennan,

juxtaposes the peace and serenity of the carol, Silent Night, with radio

news reports of real drink-drive accidents, the reportage becoming

louder and clearer throughout the two-minute ad. The ad will go on air

on Friday and Saturday evenings, to catch people as they prepare for a

night out.



All media is planned by the Media Centre, which also bought TV airtime.

Posters are bought by Concord and radio by Leo Burnett.



More than ten people die in drink-drive accidents every week. Barry

Cook, managing director of DMB&B, said: ‘Despite a reduction in deaths

and injuries, it is imperative that we keep up the pressure against

those who continue to drink and drive.’



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