NEWS: Floating voters find Tories’ advertising ‘more professional’

The Conservative Party is winning the political advertising battle and producing more polished and memorable ads than the Labour Party, according to new research carried out among young floating voters.

The Conservative Party is winning the political advertising battle and

producing more polished and memorable ads than the Labour Party,

according to new research carried out among young floating voters.



The Tories’ advertising was perceived as being ‘more professional’

according to the findings of the ad research specialist, Davies Riley-

Smith Maclay. The ‘demon eyes’ campaign, created by M&C Saatchi,

achieved universal awareness among the focus groups of floating voters

aged 35 and under.



However, there was some encouragement for Labour’s positive approach -

its ‘pledge’ campaign, which ran earlier in the summer, was voted the

best overall ad.



This finding comes in the week that Labour dropped its ads accusing the

Tories of telling lies. One Labour source said: ‘The public is getting

very disillusioned with negative campaigning.’ Labour has now opted for

a positive campaign to promote Tony Blair’s key policies.



Labour’s ad agency, BMP DDB, this week launched a pounds 200,000 four-

week push on 2,000 poster sites with six variations on the ‘New Labour’

theme, claiming the party will provide a new Britain, a new start, new

opportunities, prosperity, care and security.



BMP will also be helped by a probable hike in its budget: Labour is

likely to use all the pounds 1 million donated by Chelsea Football

Club’s vice-chairman, Matthew Harding, to supplement its pounds 2

million advertising budget.



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