NEWS: Guilty plea entered for ex-Saatchi chief in Jaguar fraud trial

Sensational details emerged in the pounds 2.5 million fraud case this week against Renny Platt, the former Saatchi and Saatchi joint head of facilities, who has pleaded guilty to conspiring to milk the car giant, Jaguar, out of hundreds of thousands of pounds (Campaign, 10 November).

Sensational details emerged in the pounds 2.5 million fraud case this

week against Renny Platt, the former Saatchi and Saatchi joint head of

facilities, who has pleaded guilty to conspiring to milk the car giant,

Jaguar, out of hundreds of thousands of pounds (Campaign, 10 November).



The trial, which opened at London’s Snaresbrook Crown Court on 6

November, followed a Metropolitan Police probe in 1992 into the awarding

of contracts for reprinting and translating Jaguar handbooks and manuals

and the submission of faked invoices to the company. Platt has pleaded

guilty alongside the two former senior employees implicated at Jaguar

Cars.



The prosecuting counsel, David Bate, told the court this week: ‘Between

1987 and 1991 Jaguar Cars had a big problem, only it didn’t know it at

the time.



‘Two of its trusted senior employees were systematically defrauding

Jaguar on a large scale.’



Roger Fielding, 43, and Roger Parker, 61, were the two most senior

employees in Jaguar’s technical publications unit. They were responsible

for drawing up and approving contracts and payments for translating and

typesetting work.



They gave work to Platt to be carried out by his company, No. 32 Ltd, a

subsidiary of Facilities Group, which was then owned by Saatchis. He, in

turn, passed work on to Roger Kennedy, then the director of the

typesetting company, Nova Arts. Kennedy is accused of money laundering.



Platt would submit invoices with a massive overcharge to be approved by

Fielding or Parker, and Kennedy would supply false invoices to Platt. He

would pay them, but later be reimbursed by Kennedy, who gave him signed

blank cheques, Bate said.



‘Mr Platt would put it in his back pocket, bribe Fielding with it or put

it on the horses,’ Bate said. He said the scheme was ‘pretty enormous’,

explaining that he could not put a precise figure on it.



The hearing continues.



The Roger Kennedy referred to in this story should not be confused with

the head of typography at Saatchis, who has the same name.



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