NEWS: Hollick fronts AA’s lobby to Labour

Britain’s advertising industry is making Labour the top target during the party conference season in its biggest effort yet to influence the potential members of an incoming government.

Britain’s advertising industry is making Labour the top target during

the party conference season in its biggest effort yet to influence the

potential members of an incoming government.



In contrast to what will be a relatively low-key effort at the

Conservative conference in Bournemouth, the Advertising Association is

pulling out all the stops for Labour at Blackpool next week. There will

be a state-of-the-art exhibition stand and a PR initiative fronted by

Lord Hollick, the Labour peer and chief executive of United News and

Media.



AA executives believe this is their big chance to help mould Labour

policy in the wake of a recent appeal by Nigel Griffiths, the party’s

consumer affairs spokesman, for the industry to make its views known

(Campaign, 30 August).



The AA is spending about pounds 7,000 on the stand, which will feature a

touch-screen competition, as part of its attempt to promote the self-

regulatory system and advertising’s importance to the economy.



Meanwhile, Hollick, who is also a member of the AA’s president’s

committee, will host a reception which will be attended by more than 100

Labour MPs.



However, Jonathan Bullock, the AA’s head of external affairs, said the

heavy emphasis on Labour did not mean that the association regarded the

outcome of the next general election as a foregone conclusion.



‘It’s not that we necessarily expect Labour to form the next

government,’ Bullock said. ‘It’s just that the party is still making up

its mind about advertising and there is a real chance to influence its

thinking.’



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