NEWS: Law Society hires JWT to counter negative image

J. Walter Thompson has scooped a controversial advertising task for the Law Society that aims to improve the image of solicitors across England and Wales.

J. Walter Thompson has scooped a controversial advertising task for the

Law Society that aims to improve the image of solicitors across England

and Wales.



JWT won the business after pitching against Rileys Advertising and Aspen

Communications - both of which managed accounts for similar professional

bodies. Rileys recently handled a campaign for the Law Society of

Scotland. Aspen, meanwhile, works with the Institute of Chartered

Accountants.



The Law Society account, which will include press and television

advertising, is expected to spend pounds 5 million over the next three

years.



The pitches were conducted on Wednesday by the Law Society’s public

relations working party under the direction of its president, Martin

Mears. The agencies were asked to come up with ideas to ‘enhance the

image and standing of solicitors in England and Wales, encouraging the

public to value their services more highly’. JWT’s winning idea still

has to be ratified by the society’s 75-member council.



Stephen Carter, JWT’s managing director, said: ‘We are delighted to have

been appointed. Working with the Law Society is a dream brief.

Advertising is an advocacy business, so we will be doing advocacy for

advocacy.’



A Law Society spokeswoman confirmed that JWT had won the account.

However, the organisation’s head of public relations who conducted the

pitch, Jayne Ferrin, was unavailable for comment as Campaign went to

press.



The issue of advertising continues to split the profession, with some

solicitors, particularly those working for commercial clients,

questioning its benefit.



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