NEWS: O&M ads show practical side to Ford

Ogilvy and Mather has created a pounds 2.5 million campaign for the Ford Maverick, aimed at showing how the off-road vehicle is as practical for everyday driving as it is for tackling mountain roads.

Ogilvy and Mather has created a pounds 2.5 million campaign for the Ford

Maverick, aimed at showing how the off-road vehicle is as practical for

everyday driving as it is for tackling mountain roads.



The three 20-second commercials feature a shrunken Ford Maverick driven

by a couple who are grinning inanely. The ads have the feel of films

such as Honey I Shrunk the Kids and Fantastic Voyage, which show pint-

sized characters surviving in a giant world. The first film, entitled

‘body’, features a builder with painful indigestion. As he grips his

stomach in pain, the camera zooms into his mouth and we see the mini-

Maverick driving up his rubbery-looking oesophagus. The builder takes a

gulp of milky drink but the ensuing flood of liquid down his throat

fails to faze the cheery couple in the 4x4, who flick on their

windscreen washers and carry on driving.



The second film, called ‘club’, features a DJ playing scratch music on a

turntable, as the intrepid couple manoeuvre a Maverick along the grooves

in the record.



The final film, ‘sofa’, shows the Maverick travelling over rubbish

under a settee.



The campaign was created by Mark Orbine, an O&M copywriter, and art

directed by John McLaughlin. It was directed by Alex Winter through

Brave Films.



Leon Jaume, the O&M creative director for Ford, said: ‘People who buy

these cars aren’t all hairy-arsed outward bound types who want to rush

off and scale the peaks. They use them to go to Tesco.’



The ads break this week with an initial two-week burst on ITV and

Channel 4.



Topics

Before commenting please read our rules for commenting on articles.

If you see a comment you find offensive, you can flag it as inappropriate. In the top right-hand corner of an individual comment, you will see 'flag as inappropriate'. Clicking this prompts us to review the comment. For further information see our rules for commenting on articles.

comments powered by Disqus